Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:13 pm

This resource is a compilation of well log observation data with access to scanned or digital well logs for Kansas oil and gas wells provided by the Kansas Geological Survey. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains 5 worksheets, the data, resource provider information, including information about the template with notes related to revisions of the template, a field list (data mapping view), and log type terms. This resource was provided by the Kansas Geological Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:12 pm

This resource contains Thermal Conductivity data compiled by the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey, Minerals and Energy, Division of Geology and Mineral Resources. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains 5 worksheets, including information about the template, resource provider information, the data, a field list (data mapping view), and vocabularies (data valid terms) used to populate the data worksheet. Field names in the template include Measurement Procedure, Average Thermal Conductivity, Geologic Formation Type and Sample Depth. This resource was submitted by the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey, Minerals and Energy, Division of Geology and Mineral Resources and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:09 pm

This resource is a compilation of well header data from oil and gas wells compiled by the Kansas Geological Survey. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and two Excel workbooks for download. The workbooks contain four worksheets, including information about the template with notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, and a field list (data mapping view). This resource was provided by the Kansas Geological Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:07 pm

This resource is a compilation of Thermal Conductivity data compiled by the Vermont Geological Survey. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains 5 worksheets, including information about the template, notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, and a field list (data mapping view). This resource was provided by the Vermont Geological Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:05 pm

The Kansas Surficial Geology map service was provided by the Kansas Geological Survey and made available through the National Geothermal Data System. The complete data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, and an ESRI service endpoint. This map services provide access to the generalized state geology map, as well as multiple counties at 1:24,000 scale surficial geology maps. Geology polygon files, contacts, marker beds, and faults are included in the map service. The surficial geology polygon data contains the map unit symbol and map unit name. This map data is not standardized to the National Geothermal Data System interoperable exchange formats.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

This resource is metadata for Open File Report 1988-03 from the University of Wisconsin-Extension Geological and Natural History Survey. The article summarizes the results of uranium and thorium investigations, by gamma-ray spectrometry, of several Precambrian rock units in Wisconsin. It is available for download as a 47 page PDF from the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey. This data was provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and made available for distribution through the AASG National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

This resource is a compilation of well header feature data from water and observation wells in the state of Wisconsin. The data were collected and compiled by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains 4 worksheets, including information about the template with notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, and a field list (data mapping view). This resource was provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

This resource is a comprehensive summary of the geology of Marathon County: distribution and character of exposed bedrock units including maps. The file downloads represent the digital information derived from Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey Information Circular 45, entitled "Precambrian geology of Marathon County, Wisconsin," by G.L. LaBerge and P.E. Myers. The resources include the map as an image in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (pdf), as a georeferenced image in LizardTech MrSID format (sid), and as GIS data with metadata. The GIS data are provided in ESRI shapefile format, and the metadata are provided in ASCII text and HTML formats. Please see the metadata for information on how the GIS data have been captured and attributed. To obtain a printed copy of the map, please contact WGNHS Map Sales by telephone at (608) 263-7389 or fax at (608) 262-8086 and request Precambrian geology of Marathon County, Wisconsin: WGNHS Information Circular 45.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

Web page with links to Wisconsin geoscience maps and data: geology maps, glacial maps, groundwater maps, surface water maps, and soil maps.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

This resource is a compilation of Borehole Temperature observation data for oil and gas wells and temperature-gradient wells in Wisconsin, provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains contains 4 worksheets, including information about the template with notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, and a field list (data mapping view). This resource was provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

This resource is a compilation of Well Log observation data from water wells and observation wells in Wisconsin, provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains 5 worksheets, including information about the template with notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, a field list (data mapping view) and vocabularies (data valid terms) used to populate the data worksheet. This resource was provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

This resource is a compilation of lithology log interval observation data associated with boreholes from 2 wells in Wisconsin from which data pertinent to geothermal resources were collected. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The workbook contains 5 worksheets, including information about the template, notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, and the field list (data mapping view). This resource was provided by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015 12:04 pm

Inferring principal stress directions from geologic data, focal mechanisms and in-situ stress measurements, we have prepared a map of principal horizontal stress orientations for the conterminous United States. Stress provinces with linear dimensions which range between 100 and 2000 km were defined on the basis of the directions and relative magnitude of principal stresses. Within a given province, stress orientations appear quite uniform (usually within the estimated range of accuracy of the different methods used to determine stress). Available data on the transition in stress direction between the different stress provinces indicate that these transitions can be abrupt, occurring over less than 75 km in places. In the western United States, a region of active tectonism characterized by high levels of seismicity and generally high heat flow, the stress pattern is complex, but numerous stress provinces can be well delineated. Despite relative tectonic quiescence in the eastern and central United States, a major variation in principal stress orientation is apparent between the Atlantic Coast and mid-continental areas. Most of the eastern United States is marked by predominantly compressional tectonism (combined thrust and strike-slip faulting), whereas much of the region west of the southern Great Plains is characterized by predominantly extensional tectonics (combined normal and strike-slip faulting). Deformation along the San Andreas fault and in parts of the Sierra Nevada is nearly pure strike-slip. Exceptions to this general pattern include areas of compressional tectonics in the western United States (the Pacific Northwest, the Colorado Plateau interior, and the Big Bend segment of the San Andreas fault) and the normal growth faulting along the Gulf Coastal Plain. Sources of stress are constrained not only by the orientation and relative magnitude of the stress within a given province but also by the manner of transition of the stress field from one province to another. Much of the modem pattern of stress in the western United States can be attributed to present transform motion and residual thermal and dynamic effects of Tertiary subduction along the western edge of the North American plate. Abrupt stress transitions around actively extending regions in the western United States probably reflect shallow sources of stress and anomalously thin lithosphere. Large areas characterized by a uniform stress field in the central and eastern United States suggest broad scale plate tectonic forces. In the mid-continent region, both ridge push and asthenospheric viscous drag resistant to lithospheric motion can explain the NE-SW compression in the cold, thick lithosphere of the craton, although drag-induced stress directions (resistance to absolute plate motion) correlate better with the data than do the ridge push directions. Asthenospheric counter-flow models do not apply in this region, as predicted stress orientations are about 90 degrees off. A region of compression oriented approximately perpendicular to the continental margin and Appalachian fold belt is defined by the stress data along the Atlantic Coast. This NW-SE compression is in direct contrast with previous models predicting extension perpendicular to passive continental margins due to lateral density contrast as the continental-oceanic crust interface. Ridge push forces, while capable of producing components of compression across the coastal area, do not explain the observed orientation of the stress. Two speculative mechanisms are suggested to explain the observed orientations (1: rotation of stress (or strain) due to anisotropic Appalachian basement structure and ( 2) flexural effects associated with erosion and isostatic rebound of the Appalachians.

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Friday, December 11, 2015 9:36 am

Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits are routinely used in the oil and gas industry for drilling medium to hard rock but have not been adopted for geothermal drilling, largely due to past reliability issues and higher purchase costs. The Sandia Geothermal Research Department has recently completed a field demonstration of the applicability of advanced synthetic diamond drill bits for production geothermal drilling. Two commercially-available PDC bits were tested in a geothermal drilling program in the Chocolate Mountains in Southern California. These bits drilled the granitic formations with significantly better Rate of Penetration (ROP) and bit life than the roller cone bit they are compared with. Drilling records and bit performance data along with associated drilling cost savings are presented herein. The drilling trials have demonstrated PDC bit drilling technology has matured for applicability and improvements to geothermal drilling. This will be especially beneficial for development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems whereby resources can be accessed anywhere within the continental US by drilling to deep, hot resources in hard, basement rock formations.

PDC Bits Outperform Conventional Bit in Geothermal Drilling Project, GRC Paper, Geothermal Resources Council 2012

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Friday, December 11, 2015 9:33 am

Custom MATLAB and custom GMT scripts for Hawaii Play Fairway Analysis modeling. Custom GMT scripts for Hawaii Play Fairway Analysis modeling.

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