Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

California State University Long Beach evaluated hydraulic connectivity among geothermal wells using Periodic Hydraulic Testing (PHT) and Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS). The principal was to create a pressure signal in one well and observe the responding pressure signals in one or more observation wells to assess the permeability and storage of the fracture network that connects the two wells. DAS measured strain at mHz frequency in monitoring wells in response to PHT. DAS file sampled at 1kHz with a standard fiber optic cable during the 720 second period step test at well FSE13.

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

California State University Long Beach evaluated hydraulic connectivity among geothermal wells using Periodic Hydraulic Testing (PHT) and Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS). The principal was to create a pressure signal in one well and observe the responding pressure signals in one or more observation wells to assess the permeability and storage of the fracture network that connects the two wells. DAS measured strain at mHz frequency in monitoring wells in response to PHT. DAS file sampled at 1kHz with a tight buffered fiber optic cable during the 480 second period step test at well FSE10.

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

Results for laser ablation measurement of rare earth elements and electron microprobe analysis of major elements in hydrothermal epidote. Laser ablation measurements were completed using an Agilent 7700 quadrupole ICP-MS coupled with 193nm Photon Instruments Excimer laser. Epidote analyses data for RN12 and RN30 in the format of the AASG Mineral Recovery Brine Content Model. See tabs "WRMajorElements" and "RareEarths" for data.

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

Various data sets displayed on a 2km grid for the Play Fairway Analysis CA-NV-OR area. Heat flow by 2km grid

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

Various data sets displayed on a 2km grid for the Play Fairway Analysis CA-NV-OR area. Graph showing skew of favorability due to quantity of data in each 2km grid.

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

Hydraulic responses from periodic hydraulic tests conducted at the Mirror Lake Fractured Rock Research Site, during the summer of 2015. These hydraulic responses were measured also using distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) which is cataloged in a different submission under this grant number. The tests are explained in detail in Matthew Cole's MS Thesis which is cataloged here.

The injection and drawdown data and the codes used to analyze the data. Sinusoidal Data is a Matlab data file containing a data table for each period-length test. Within each table is a column labeled: time (seconds since beginning of pumping), Inj_m3pm (formation injection in cubic meters per minute), and head for each observation well (meters). The three Matlab script files (*.m) were used to analyze hydraulic responses from the data file above. High-Pass Sinusoid is a routine for filtering the data, computing the FFT, and extracting phase and amplitude values. Borestore is a routine which contains the borehole storage analytic solution and compares modeled amplitude and phase from this solution to computed amplitude and phase from the data. Patsearch Borestore is a routine containing the built-in pattern search optimization method. This minimizes the total error between modeled and actual amplitude and phase in Borestore. Comments within the script files contain more specific instructions for their use. Matlab script that accounts for borehole storage in the estimation of T and S

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory, Eastman Chemical, Turbine Air Systems, and the Electric Power Research Institute are evaluating the feasibility of using geothermal heat to improve the efficiency of natural gas power plants. The area of interest is the Eastman Chemical plant in Longview, Texas, which is on the northwestern margin of the Sabine Uplift. The study is focused on determining the potential for a geothermal reservoir within a 10 km radius of the site as defined by data from existing geological studies and cross-sections within the depths of 2,100 to 3,400 meters. Wells within a 20 km radius are included for broader geological comparison to determine the heat flow, temperature-at-depth, and oil and gas field porosity and permeability. The geothermal reservoir model is based on the multiple formation top data sources, published literature data, and well log interpretations within the 10 km radius. Area thickness estimates, reservoir extent bounding parameters, potential flow rates, and temperatures are combined to calculate a reservoir productivity index and develop a reservoir production model. Historical fluid volumes production data are used as an independent check for the reservoir productivity index and production model results. The reservoir parameters calculated here are being used for the surface engineering model to determine the economic viability of using geothermal fluids for a deep direct use application at this site. The data files are submitted as separate workbooks in 'content model' format, including: Well Fluid Production, Heat Flow, and Geologic Reservoir. Steps to calculate heat flow and temperature-at-depth maps using Python code.

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019 2:00 pm

California State University Long Beach evaluated hydraulic connectivity among geothermal wells using Periodic Hydraulic Testing (PHT) and Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS). The principal was to create a pressure signal in one well and observe the responding pressure signals in one or more observation wells to assess the permeability and storage of the fracture network that connects the two wells. DAS measured strain at mHz frequency in monitoring wells in response to PHT. DAS file sampled at 1kHz with a tight buffered fiber optic cable during the 1080 second period step test at well FSE10.

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Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:11 pm

The Portland Basin is a prime location to assess the feasibility of DDU-TES because natural geologic conditions provide thermal and hydraulic separation from overlying aquifers that would otherwise sweep away stored heat. Under the Portland Basin, the lower Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) aquifers contain brackish water (1,000-10,000 mg/L TDS), indicating low groundwater flow rates and poor connection with the overlying regional aquifer. Further, CRBG lavas tend to have comparatively low thermal conductivity, indicating that the 400-1,000 ft thick CRBG may be an effective thermal barrier to the overlying aquifer. A temporally and spatially limited previous study of a Portland Basin CRBG aquifer demonstrated that the injection of waste heat resulted in an increase in temperature by more than a factor of two, indicating a high potential for storing heat.

This data submission includes comma delimited .XYZ grid of top Columbia River Basalt (CRBG) elevations in the Portland Basin, a spreadsheet of ArcGIS attribute table for associated data points, a map of data types used to constrain top CRBG, top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software, and cross sections through top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software.
Top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software

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Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:11 pm

The Portland Basin is a prime location to assess the feasibility of DDU-TES because natural geologic conditions provide thermal and hydraulic separation from overlying aquifers that would otherwise sweep away stored heat. Under the Portland Basin, the lower Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) aquifers contain brackish water (1,000-10,000 mg/L TDS), indicating low groundwater flow rates and poor connection with the overlying regional aquifer. Further, CRBG lavas tend to have comparatively low thermal conductivity, indicating that the 400-1,000 ft thick CRBG may be an effective thermal barrier to the overlying aquifer. A temporally and spatially limited previous study of a Portland Basin CRBG aquifer demonstrated that the injection of waste heat resulted in an increase in temperature by more than a factor of two, indicating a high potential for storing heat.

This data submission includes comma delimited .XYZ grid of top Columbia River Basalt (CRBG) elevations in the Portland Basin, a spreadsheet of ArcGIS attribute table for associated data points, a map of data types used to constrain top CRBG, top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software, and cross sections through top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software.
Excel spreadsheet of ArcGIS attribute table for associated data points

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Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:02 pm

The Portland Basin is a prime location to assess the feasibility of DDU-TES because natural geologic conditions provide thermal and hydraulic separation from overlying aquifers that would otherwise sweep away stored heat. Under the Portland Basin, the lower Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) aquifers contain brackish water (1,000-10,000 mg/L TDS), indicating low groundwater flow rates and poor connection with the overlying regional aquifer. Further, CRBG lavas tend to have comparatively low thermal conductivity, indicating that the 400-1,000 ft thick CRBG may be an effective thermal barrier to the overlying aquifer. A temporally and spatially limited previous study of a Portland Basin CRBG aquifer demonstrated that the injection of waste heat resulted in an increase in temperature by more than a factor of two, indicating a high potential for storing heat.

This data submission includes comma delimited .XYZ grid of top Columbia River Basalt (CRBG) elevations in the Portland Basin, a spreadsheet of ArcGIS attribute table for associated data points, a map of data types used to constrain top CRBG, top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software, and cross sections through top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software.
Map of survey data types used to constrain top CRBG, displayed on a DEM map. Data types include shallow checking, seismic, outcrop, and well data.

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Friday, January 11, 2019 12:38 pm

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory, Eastman Chemical, Turbine Air Systems, and the Electric Power Research Institute are evaluating the feasibility of using geothermal heat to improve the efficiency of natural gas power plants. The area of interest is the Eastman Chemical plant in Longview, Texas, which is on the northwestern margin of the Sabine Uplift. The study is focused on determining the potential for a geothermal reservoir within a 10 km radius of the site as defined by data from existing geological studies and cross-sections within the depths of 2,100 to 3,400 meters. Wells within a 20 km radius are included for broader geological comparison to determine the heat flow, temperature-at-depth, and oil and gas field porosity and permeability. The geothermal reservoir model is based on the multiple formation top data sources, published literature data, and well log interpretations within the 10 km radius. Area thickness estimates, reservoir extent bounding parameters, potential flow rates, and temperatures are combined to calculate a reservoir productivity index and develop a reservoir production model. Historical fluid volumes production data are used as an independent check for the reservoir productivity index and production model results. The reservoir parameters calculated here are being used for the surface engineering model to determine the economic viability of using geothermal fluids for a deep direct use application at this site. The data files are submitted as separate workbooks in 'content model' format, including: Well Fluid Production, Heat Flow, and Geologic Reservoir. Python code and steps to calculate heat flow and temperature-at-depth maps.

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Friday, January 11, 2019 12:38 pm

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory, Eastman Chemical, Turbine Air Systems, and the Electric Power Research Institute are evaluating the feasibility of using geothermal heat to improve the efficiency of natural gas power plants. The area of interest is the Eastman Chemical plant in Longview, Texas, which is on the northwestern margin of the Sabine Uplift. The study is focused on determining the potential for a geothermal reservoir within a 10 km radius of the site as defined by data from existing geological studies and cross-sections within the depths of 2,100 to 3,400 meters. Wells within a 20 km radius are included for broader geological comparison to determine the heat flow, temperature-at-depth, and oil and gas field porosity and permeability. The geothermal reservoir model is based on the multiple formation top data sources, published literature data, and well log interpretations within the 10 km radius. Area thickness estimates, reservoir extent bounding parameters, potential flow rates, and temperatures are combined to calculate a reservoir productivity index and develop a reservoir production model. Historical fluid volumes production data are used as an independent check for the reservoir productivity index and production model results. The reservoir parameters calculated here are being used for the surface engineering model to determine the economic viability of using geothermal fluids for a deep direct use application at this site. The data files are submitted as separate workbooks in 'content model' format, including: Well Fluid Production, Heat Flow, and Geologic Reservoir. The steps for calculating heat flow and understanding the different variables including temperature correction and thermal conductivity.

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Friday, January 11, 2019 12:38 pm

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory, Eastman Chemical, Turbine Air Systems, and the Electric Power Research Institute are evaluating the feasibility of using geothermal heat to improve the efficiency of natural gas power plants. The area of interest is the Eastman Chemical plant in Longview, Texas, which is on the northwestern margin of the Sabine Uplift. The study is focused on determining the potential for a geothermal reservoir within a 10 km radius of the site as defined by data from existing geological studies and cross-sections within the depths of 2,100 to 3,400 meters. Wells within a 20 km radius are included for broader geological comparison to determine the heat flow, temperature-at-depth, and oil and gas field porosity and permeability. The geothermal reservoir model is based on the multiple formation top data sources, published literature data, and well log interpretations within the 10 km radius. Area thickness estimates, reservoir extent bounding parameters, potential flow rates, and temperatures are combined to calculate a reservoir productivity index and develop a reservoir production model. Historical fluid volumes production data are used as an independent check for the reservoir productivity index and production model results. The reservoir parameters calculated here are being used for the surface engineering model to determine the economic viability of using geothermal fluids for a deep direct use application at this site. The data files are submitted as separate workbooks in 'content model' format, including: Well Fluid Production, Heat Flow, and Geologic Reservoir. The data inputs related to the reservoir models, e.g., porosity, permeability, layer thickness, BHT, pressure, etc.

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Friday, January 11, 2019 12:38 pm

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory, Eastman Chemical, Turbine Air Systems, and the Electric Power Research Institute are evaluating the feasibility of using geothermal heat to improve the efficiency of natural gas power plants. The area of interest is the Eastman Chemical plant in Longview, Texas, which is on the northwestern margin of the Sabine Uplift. The study is focused on determining the potential for a geothermal reservoir within a 10 km radius of the site as defined by data from existing geological studies and cross-sections within the depths of 2,100 to 3,400 meters. Wells within a 20 km radius are included for broader geological comparison to determine the heat flow, temperature-at-depth, and oil and gas field porosity and permeability. The geothermal reservoir model is based on the multiple formation top data sources, published literature data, and well log interpretations within the 10 km radius. Area thickness estimates, reservoir extent bounding parameters, potential flow rates, and temperatures are combined to calculate a reservoir productivity index and develop a reservoir production model. Historical fluid volumes production data are used as an independent check for the reservoir productivity index and production model results. The reservoir parameters calculated here are being used for the surface engineering model to determine the economic viability of using geothermal fluids for a deep direct use application at this site. The data files are submitted as separate workbooks in 'content model' format, including: Well Fluid Production, Heat Flow, and Geologic Reservoir. Discussion and steps in the different reservoir models used for this East Texas DDU Feasibility study

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