Wednesday, April 4, 2018 1:45 pm

Locality. About 10 miles north of Silver Peak, Nevada, there lies, by the roadside, a deposit of alum and sulphur. This has been many times located and prospected as a sulphur mine, but not until recently has the relatively important amount of alum in it been recognized. No important work has yet been done on the deposit. USGS Professional Paper (PP: 55), pg 157. For more info about this resource or to download this resource, please see the links provided.

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Wednesday, April 4, 2018 1:44 pm

This resource is available as a downloadable file, ESRI Service, and as a Web Feature service. Resource includes a Geologic Map, Minor Structures and Air Photograph Linears for the Enosburg Falls Quadrangle, Minor Structures and Air Photograph Linears for the Jay Peak Quadrangle, and a text on Bedrock geology for the Enosburg area, Vermont. Abstract: The area here described extends broadly from the Hinesburg thrust in the west, to the west flank of the Green Mountain anticlinorium to the east. The central feature is the Enosburg anticlinorium. The Oak Hill succession in Vermont is re-defined as a result of recent work. To the west, the succession is miogeosynclinal in character, and easily classified. It changes eastward into a cugeosvnclinal sequence difficult to classify stratigraphically.

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Tuesday, April 3, 2018 3:38 pm

This resource contains a compilation of well log observation data from over 128,000 oil and gas wells in Texas, provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. The data are available in the following formats: web feature service, web map service, ESRI service endpoint, and an Excel workbook for download. The Excel workbook contains 9 worksheets, including information about the template, notes related to revisions of the template, resource provider information, the data, a field list (data mapping view), and vocabularies (data valid terms) used to populate the data worksheet. Fields in the data worksheet include Well Name, API Number, Ended Drilling Date, Well Type, Bottom Logged Interval, Scanned File URL, and Log Notes. This resource was provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and made available for distribution through the National Geothermal Data System.

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Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:23 pm

Augustine Volcano erupted explosively after 20 years of quiescence on January 11, 2006, followed by approximately 2 months of dome building and lava extrusion. This is the best monitored eruption in Alaska to date; the diverse complementary datasets gathered enable an interdisciplinary interpretation of volcanic activity. An analysis of reduced displacement (continuous measure of seismic tremor amplitude) and thermal energy output (from satellite imagery) observed between January 1 and April 30, 2006, shows relationships linked to the type of eruptive activity. Three different types of volcanic behavior can be identified as they show specific patterns in the combined data sets: (1) explosive activity, (2) lava extrusion (dome growth), and (3) cooling of erupted products. Explosive activity was characterized by high reduced displacement values but relatively low radiative thermal flux. Lava extrusion occurred in three distinct sequences characterized by increased values of reduced displacement and increased thermal emissions. Two periods of elevated thermal energy output and reduced displacement coincided with times of deflation, suggesting an increase in extrusion rate. Periods of cooling were marked by decreasing thermal emissions and reduced displacement. This work highlights the value of combined observations, which reveal more about the status of an active volcano than individual methods alone.

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Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:23 pm

REQUIRED FIELD

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Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:23 pm

The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, with about 2000-MW electrical capacity, is the largest geothermal field in the world. Despite its importance as a resource and as an example of a vapor-dominated reservoir, very few complete geochemical analyses of the steam have been published (Allen and Day, 1927; Truesdell and others, 1987). This report presents data from 90 steam, gas, and condensate samples from wells in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California. Samples were collected between 1978 and 1991. Well attributes include sampling date, well name, location, total depth, and the wellhead temperature and pressure at which the sample was collected. Geochemical characteristics include the steam/gas ratio, composition of noncondensable gas (relative proportions of CO2, H2S, He, H2, O2, Ar, N2, CH4, and NH3), and isotopic values for deltaD and delta18O of H2O, delta13C of CO2, and delta34S of H2S. The compilation includes 81 analyses from 74 different production wells, 9 isotopic analyses of steam condensate pumped into injection wells, and 5 complete geochemical analyses on gases from surface fumaroles and bubbling pools. Most samples were collected as saturated steam and plot along the liquid-water/steam boiling curve. Steam-togas ratios are highest in the southeastern part of the geothermal field and lowest in the northwest, consistent with other studies. Wells in the Northwest Geysers are also enriched in N2/Ar, CO2 and CH4, deltaD, and delta18O. Well discharges from the Southeast Geysers are high in steam/gas and have isotopic compositions and N2/Ar ratios consistent with recharge by local meteoric waters. Samples from the Central Geysers show characteristics found in both the Southeast and Northwest Geysers. Gas and steam characteristics of well discharges from the Northwest Geysers are consistent with input of components from a high-temperature reservoir containing carbonrich gases derived from the host Franciscan rocks. Throughout the geothermal field, the carbon-isotopic composition of CO2 is consistent with derivation of carbon from Franciscan metasedimentary rocks. NH3 concentrations are high in most Geysers well fluids, and are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than would be expected in a the gas phase exhibiting homogeneous equilibrium at normal reservoir temperatures and pressures. Evidently, NH3 is flushed from the Franciscan host rocks at a rate that exceeds the reaction rate for NH3 breakdown. Many wells show clear influence by fluids from reinjection wells where steam condensate has been pumped back into the geothermal reservoir. Six wells were resampled over the time period of this study. One of these six wells was strongly affected by a nearby injection well. Three of the six resampled wells showed some signs of decreasing liquid/ steam within the geothermal reservoir, consistent with 'drying out' of the reservoir due to steam withdrawal. However, two wells exhibited little change. Analyses of gases from five surface manifestations (fumaroles and bubbling pools) are roughly similar to the deeper geothermal samples in both chemical and isotopic composition, but are lower in soluble gases that dissolve in groundwater during transit toward the surface.

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Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:23 pm

The Virginia Range, immediately southeast of Reno, Nev., consists mainly of flows, breccias, and turfs of Miocene age. Most of these volcanic rocks are of intermediate composition; rhyodacite is the most common rock type. Basalt, rhyolite and rhyolite tuff, and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks of Miocene and Pliocene age also cover substantial areas in the range. Pre-Tertiary metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and granitic rocks are exposed in scattered inliers, mostly along the southern and eastern margins of the range. Several large areas and many small areas within the volcanic pile were subjected to hydrothermal alteration during and after the period of intermediate volcanic activity. Economic precious metal mineralization is spatially and temporally associated with the hydrothermal alteration in several areas. The most important deposit is the Comstock Lode, which produced 192 million troy ounces of silver and 8.3 million troy ounces of gold from epithermal veins (Bonham, 1969). The hydrothermally altered rocks include silicified, advanced argillic, montmorillonite-bearing argillic, and propylitic types. The first three types typically contain pyrite, and some propylitic rocks contain pyrite as well. Supergene oxidation of these pyritic rocks produces limonitic bleached rocks. The term 'limonite,' as used here, refers to any combination of the minerals hematite, goethite, and Jarosite. Where vegetation cover is sparse to moderate, these limonitic rocks are readily identified on Landsat images enhanced by the color-ratio composite technique developed by Rowan and others (1974), so the altered areas can be mapped. About 30 percent tree cover (here mainly pinyon pine) is sufficient to change the spectral signature of individual picture elements (pixels) enough so that limonitic materials can no longer be uniquely identified. As in all other areas where this technique has been applied, limonitic unaltered rocks with intermediate to high albedos have the same appearance on the color-ratio composite as limonitic altered rocks. This problem represents the most important limitation to the use of enhanced Landsat images for detection and mapping of hydrothermally altered rocks. Reflectance spectra of altered and unaltered rocks taken in the field in the Virginia Range show that most altered rocks have a conspicuous absorption band near 2.2 ?m produced by clay minerals or alunite, whereas unaltered rocks have no features in this spectral region. Thus spectral information for selected bands in the 1.1-2.5 ?m region may allow discrimination between limonitic altered and limonitic unaltered rocks (Rowan and others, 1977; Abrams and others, 1977; Rowan and Abrams, 1978). Another potential limitation is loss of spectral information on slopes with low effective sun angle. Although a minor problem in the Virginia Range, loss of information sufficient to preclude identification of limonitic altered rocks occurs with effective sun angle lower than 20-25 degrees. Thus, even at moderate latitudes substantial parts of areas with high topographic relief may be lost to observation.

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Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:23 pm

This dataset contains contacts, geologic units and map boundaries from Plate 1 of USGS Professional Paper 1456, 'The Geology and Remarkable Thermal Activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.' The features are contained in the Annotation, basins_poly, contours, geology_arc, geology_poly, point_features, and stream_arc feature classes as well as a table of geologic units and their descriptions. This dataset was constructed to produce a digital geologic map as a basis for studying hydrothermal processes in Norris Geyser Basin. The original map does not contain registration tic marks. To create the geodatabase, the original scanned map was georegistered to USGS aerial photographs of the Norris Junction quadrangle collected in 1994. Manmade objects, i.e. roads, parking lots, and the visitor center, along with stream junctions and other hydrographic features, were used for registration.

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