Wednesday, March 6, 2019 3:34 pm

Tier 3 data for Appalachian Basin sectors of New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia used in a Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis of opportunities for low-temperature direct-use applications of heat. It accompanies data and materials submitted as Geothermal Data Repository Submission "Natural Reservoir Analysis 2016 GPFA-AB" (linked below). Reservoir information are derived from oil and gas exploration and production data sets, or derived from those data based on further analysis. Data reported here encompass locations (horizontal and depth), geologic formation names, lithology, reservoir volume, porosity and permeability, and derived approximations of the quality of the reservoir.

These differ from the linked 2015 data submission in that this file presents data for New York that are comparable to those in the other two states. In contrast, the 2015 data available measured differing attributes across the state boundaries. Tier 3 data for natural sedimentary rock reservoirs documented during oil and gas exploration or development for New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia sectors of the Appalachian Basin. File format in .xlsx and conforms to Geothermal Data Repository Reservoirs Content Model.

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Wednesday, March 6, 2019 3:34 pm

Paper authored by Stumpf et al. for the 2018 Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting held in Reno, NV USA. Included with the paper is the Microsoft PowerPoint presentation made at the GRC meeting and data tables associated with some of the figures. PowerPoint presentation made at the 2018 GRC Annual Meeting.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:01 pm

These core photos and descriptions were taken from the five boreholes that were drilled as part of the kISMET SubTER project conducted at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The boreholes are subvertical in orientation, and were drilled on the 4850 level of SURF on the West Drift, about 450 feet from Governor's Corner. The well heads for the five wells are in a line, but the outer two wells (k001 and k005) were deviated to form a five-spot configuration at 50 m depth. Four of the five boreholes have a nominal depth of 50 m and have HQ core - the fifth, located in the center (k003) was drilled to a depth of 100m and has NQ core. The central borehole was used for stress and hydraulic fracturing - the other four boreholes were used for monitoring purposes. Core logging was conducted by Paul Cook (LBNL), Bill Roggenthen (SDSMT), and Drew Siler (LBNL). All core consists of rocks from the Poorman Formation. Some of the core photos are missing. These have been documented in the included spreadsheets labeled with the well name and the word missing. The locations of the boreholes are documented on the included map and spreadsheet. A list of missing photos from the k003 borehole including filenames and estimated sample times.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:00 pm

This archive contains seismic shot field records for 10 profiles located in Camas Prairie, Idaho. The eight numbered .sgy files were acquired using a seismic land streamer system with an accelerated weight drop source and 72 geophones. These 10-Hz geophones were mounted on base plates and dragged behind the seismic source. Shots were acquired every 4 meters along the length of lines 500West, 550 West, 600West, 700West, 800West, 900West, 200South and 200North. The objective was to map stratigraphy and structures related to geothermal fluid flow in the upper few hundred meters. A readme file is included with descriptions of individual files.

The lines names refer to to roads which are numbered relative to the distance from the county seat (the town of Fairfield) along the the main highways. For example, 500 West implies that this north-south street crosses the main road 5 miles to the west of town. The included geologic, topographic, and aerial maps show the labeled seismic lines, while the regional map shows only the line geometry and regional faulting. Pdf images for 500W, 600W, 700W, 800W, and 900W stacked profiles. These final stacks were produced with a standard seismic processing flow that included: datum statics, spiking deconvolution, bandpass filtering, surface wave attenuation through a two-step singular value decomposition approach to estimate and adaptively subtract the ground roll signal, iterative velocity analyses with dip moveout corrections (dmo), amplitude gains, Kirchoff time migration, and a post-stack time to depth correction using dmo-corrected stacking velocity values.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:00 pm

The Portland Basin is a prime location to assess the feasibility of DDU-TES because natural geologic conditions provide thermal and hydraulic separation from overlying aquifers that would otherwise sweep away stored heat. Under the Portland Basin, the lower Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) aquifers contain brackish water (1,000-10,000 mg/L TDS), indicating low groundwater flow rates and poor connection with the overlying regional aquifer. Further, CRBG lavas tend to have comparatively low thermal conductivity, indicating that the 400-1,000 ft thick CRBG may be an effective thermal barrier to the overlying aquifer. A temporally and spatially limited previous study of a Portland Basin CRBG aquifer demonstrated that the injection of waste heat resulted in an increase in temperature by more than a factor of two, indicating a high potential for storing heat.

This data submission includes comma delimited .XYZ grid of top Columbia River Basalt (CRBG) elevations in the Portland Basin, a spreadsheet of ArcGIS attribute table for associated data points, a map of data types used to constrain top CRBG, top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software, and cross sections through top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software.
Cross sections through top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:00 pm

This archive contains seismic shot field records for 10 profiles located in Camas Prairie, Idaho. The eight numbered .sgy files were acquired using a seismic land streamer system with an accelerated weight drop source and 72 geophones. These 10-Hz geophones were mounted on base plates and dragged behind the seismic source. Shots were acquired every 4 meters along the length of lines 500West, 550 West, 600West, 700West, 800West, 900West, 200South and 200North. The objective was to map stratigraphy and structures related to geothermal fluid flow in the upper few hundred meters. A readme file is included with descriptions of individual files.

The lines names refer to to roads which are numbered relative to the distance from the county seat (the town of Fairfield) along the the main highways. For example, 500 West implies that this north-south street crosses the main road 5 miles to the west of town. The included geologic, topographic, and aerial maps show the labeled seismic lines, while the regional map shows only the line geometry and regional faulting. Seismic shot field records for 900W profile located in Camas Prairie, Idaho
This .sgy file was acquired using a seismic land streamer system with an accelerated weight drop source and 72 geophones. These 10-Hz geophones were mounted on base plates and dragged behind the seismic source. Shots were acquired every 4 meters along the length of the line. The objective was to map stratigraphy and structures related to geothermal fluid flow in the upper few hundred meters.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:00 pm

Zonge Geosciences, Inc. performed a magnetotelluric (MT) survey for the Glass Buttes Project at the request of Ormat Technologies Inc. during the period of 7 October 2010 to 8 November 2010. This report provides the deep electromagnetic data and methods that were used to assist Ormat Technologies in assessing potential geothermal resources in the area.

Tensor magnetotelluric data were acquired at 30 stations in the eastern survey area and array MT data were acquired along one line, 6.8 kilometers in length in the western survey area. The survey area is located in Lake County, Oregon and lies within the Glass Butte and Hat Butte, Oregon topographic areas. Summary report of magnetotelluric survey completed for the Glass Buttes geothermal resource assessment. Describes survey control, data acquisition, instrumentation, data processing, parameter definitions and computations, data quality, 1D and 2D inversion, data presentation, and safety and environmental issues.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:00 pm

These core photos and descriptions were taken from the five boreholes that were drilled as part of the kISMET SubTER project conducted at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The boreholes are subvertical in orientation, and were drilled on the 4850 level of SURF on the West Drift, about 450 feet from Governor's Corner. The well heads for the five wells are in a line, but the outer two wells (k001 and k005) were deviated to form a five-spot configuration at 50 m depth. Four of the five boreholes have a nominal depth of 50 m and have HQ core - the fifth, located in the center (k003) was drilled to a depth of 100m and has NQ core. The central borehole was used for stress and hydraulic fracturing - the other four boreholes were used for monitoring purposes. Core logging was conducted by Paul Cook (LBNL), Bill Roggenthen (SDSMT), and Drew Siler (LBNL). All core consists of rocks from the Poorman Formation. Some of the core photos are missing. These have been documented in the included spreadsheets labeled with the well name and the word missing. The locations of the boreholes are documented on the included map and spreadsheet. Photos of core samples collected from k001 borehole. Core stored at SURF. Some photos are missing and others had to be reshot due to camera malfunction. See corresponding notes and spreadsheet of missing photos.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:00 pm

This archive consists of a pdf graphic log and a LAS text file representing the results of the pressure and temperature logs measured on Nov. 8th, 2018 from the Utah FORGE deep test well 58-32 (MU-ESW1). The logs were taken by DI Drill Survey Services.
Archive with pdf graphic log and a LAS text file representing the results of the pressure and temperature logs measured on Nov. 8th, 2018 from the Utah FORGE deep test well 58-32 (MU-ESW1).

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 5:59 pm

These core photos and descriptions were taken from the five boreholes that were drilled as part of the kISMET SubTER project conducted at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The boreholes are subvertical in orientation, and were drilled on the 4850 level of SURF on the West Drift, about 450 feet from Governor's Corner. The well heads for the five wells are in a line, but the outer two wells (k001 and k005) were deviated to form a five-spot configuration at 50 m depth. Four of the five boreholes have a nominal depth of 50 m and have HQ core - the fifth, located in the center (k003) was drilled to a depth of 100m and has NQ core. The central borehole was used for stress and hydraulic fracturing - the other four boreholes were used for monitoring purposes. Core logging was conducted by Paul Cook (LBNL), Bill Roggenthen (SDSMT), and Drew Siler (LBNL). All core consists of rocks from the Poorman Formation. Some of the core photos are missing. These have been documented in the included spreadsheets labeled with the well name and the word missing. The locations of the boreholes are documented on the included map and spreadsheet. Descriptions (5 ft runs) for core samples collected from k005 borehole by Paul Cook, LBNL. Core stored at SURF.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 5:59 pm

The Portland Basin is a prime location to assess the feasibility of DDU-TES because natural geologic conditions provide thermal and hydraulic separation from overlying aquifers that would otherwise sweep away stored heat. Under the Portland Basin, the lower Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) aquifers contain brackish water (1,000-10,000 mg/L TDS), indicating low groundwater flow rates and poor connection with the overlying regional aquifer. Further, CRBG lavas tend to have comparatively low thermal conductivity, indicating that the 400-1,000 ft thick CRBG may be an effective thermal barrier to the overlying aquifer. A temporally and spatially limited previous study of a Portland Basin CRBG aquifer demonstrated that the injection of waste heat resulted in an increase in temperature by more than a factor of two, indicating a high potential for storing heat.

This data submission includes comma delimited .XYZ grid of top Columbia River Basalt (CRBG) elevations in the Portland Basin, a spreadsheet of ArcGIS attribute table for associated data points, a map of data types used to constrain top CRBG, top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software, and cross sections through top CRBG structure map created using SMT Kingdom Suite software.
Comma delimited .XYZ grid of top Columbia River Basalt (CRBG) elevations in the Portland Basin (NAD83/UTM Zone 10N projection)

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 5:59 pm

MT is measured in the field by using induction coils to measure the time-varying magnetic source for frequencies between 1000-0.001~Hz, and electric dipoles to measure the Earth's electrical response. Because the magnetic source field is polarized, orthogonal directions of the fields need to be measured to get a complete description of the fields. In all measurements collected for this project, induction coils and electric dipoles were aligned with geomagnetic north and east. MT data were collected at 22 stations with a ZEN 32-bit data logger developed by Zonge International, magnetic fields were measured with ANT-4 induction coils, and electric fields where measured with Ag-AgCl reference electrodes from Borin on 50~m dipoles. The data was collected on a repeating schedule of 10~min at 4096~samples/s and 7 hours and 50 minutes at 256 samples/s over a 20-24 hour period. To convert time series data into the frequency domain and get estimations of the impedance tensor, the processing code BIRRP was used (Chave & Thompson 2004). Simultaneous measurements were used as remote references to reduce noise and bias in the data.

Chave, A. D., & Thomson, D. J. 2004. Bounded inuence magnetotelluric response function estimation. Geophys. J. Int., 157, 988-1006. Processed MT data in standard EDI format (this is the MT communities standard format)

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 5:59 pm

This archive contains seismic shot field records for 10 profiles located in Camas Prairie, Idaho. The eight numbered .sgy files were acquired using a seismic land streamer system with an accelerated weight drop source and 72 geophones. These 10-Hz geophones were mounted on base plates and dragged behind the seismic source. Shots were acquired every 4 meters along the length of lines 500West, 550 West, 600West, 700West, 800West, 900West, 200South and 200North. The objective was to map stratigraphy and structures related to geothermal fluid flow in the upper few hundred meters. A readme file is included with descriptions of individual files.

The lines names refer to to roads which are numbered relative to the distance from the county seat (the town of Fairfield) along the the main highways. For example, 500 West implies that this north-south street crosses the main road 5 miles to the west of town. The included geologic, topographic, and aerial maps show the labeled seismic lines, while the regional map shows only the line geometry and regional faulting. Pdf images for 200N stacked profile. This final stack was produced with a standard seismic processing flow that included: datum statics, spiking deconvolution, bandpass filtering, surface wave attenuation through a two-step singular value decomposition approach to estimate and adaptively subtract the ground roll signal, iterative velocity analyses with dip moveout corrections (dmo), amplitude gains, Kirchoff time migration, and a post-stack time to depth correction using dmo-corrected stacking velocity values.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 5:59 pm

The STRESSINVERSE code uses an iterative method to find the nodal planes most consistent with the stress field given fault frictional properties. STRESINVERSE inverts the strike, rake and dip from moment tensor solutions for the in-situ state of stress. The code iteratively solves for an optimal friction parameter in evaluating the fault instability to find optimal fault planes. Vavrycuk (2014) states that numerical tests show that inversion results are insensitive to the friction parameter, and it is sufficient to assign a reasonable value for all inversions.

Vavrycuk, V., 2014. Iterative joint inversion for stress and fault orientations from focal mechanisms, Geophys. J. Int., 199, 69-77. The STRESSINVERSE code uses an iterative method to find the nodal planes most consistent with the stress field given fault frictional properties. STRESINVERSE inverts the strike, rake and dip from moment tensor solutions for the in-situ state of stress. The code iteratively solves for an optimal friction parameter in evaluating the fault instability to find optimal fault planes. Vavrycuk (2014) states that numerical tests show that inversion results are insensitive to the friction parameter, and it is sufficient to assign a reasonable value for all inversions.

Vavrycuk, V., 2014. Iterative joint inversion for stress and fault orientations from focal mechanisms, Geophys. J. Int., 199, 69–77.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 5:59 pm

This archive contains seismic shot field records for 10 profiles located in Camas Prairie, Idaho. The eight numbered .sgy files were acquired using a seismic land streamer system with an accelerated weight drop source and 72 geophones. These 10-Hz geophones were mounted on base plates and dragged behind the seismic source. Shots were acquired every 4 meters along the length of lines 500West, 550 West, 600West, 700West, 800West, 900West, 200South and 200North. The objective was to map stratigraphy and structures related to geothermal fluid flow in the upper few hundred meters. A readme file is included with descriptions of individual files.

The lines names refer to to roads which are numbered relative to the distance from the county seat (the town of Fairfield) along the the main highways. For example, 500 West implies that this north-south street crosses the main road 5 miles to the west of town. The included geologic, topographic, and aerial maps show the labeled seismic lines, while the regional map shows only the line geometry and regional faulting. Master spreadsheet with survey information and shot locations for all profiles.

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