Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:43 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Locations of select deep drill hole sites used to interrogate the subsurface for lithologic control.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:43 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Composite Common Risk Segment Map produced during Phase 1 studies. Derived from ArcGIS raster map compiled on 2 km grid scale. Represents the weighted sum of the Heat, Permeability, and Seal Common Risk Segment maps.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:42 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of lacustrine sediments deposited by paleo-Lake Burley.

Based on water well logs from IDWR, compiled by Neal Farmer

Wells show that ancient Lake Burley extended north just past the topographic scarp of lava flows from Kimama Butte, and east to just past upper end of current Lake Walcott.

Sediments up to 750 feet thick just north of current Snake River, but typically 100-200 feet thick farther north, at depths of 200-300 feet below surface.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:42 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of rhyolite domes and cryptodomes in the Snake River Plain.
Compiled by Shervais and Glen from a range of sources.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:39 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of paleo-Lake American Falls lacustrine sediments.

Distribution of American Falls lake sediments estimated from Desbrough et al 1989 (OFR89-0436), Phillips and Welhan 2006a,b (DWM-77 and DWM-78), and Trimble & Carr 1961.

AF Lake Beds range from about 20 ft thick on margins to over 100 ft thick along the axis of the lake, which was approxximately parallel to current Snake River.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:38 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of ash flow vents marginal to the Snake River Plain. Compiled by Shervais and Glen from a range of sources.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:38 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of sediments from paleo Lake Terreton.
Estimated from data in Anderson et al 1996 (OFR96-248) and Anderson et al 1997 (OFR97-4010). Sediment layers generally fairly thin,

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:37 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of basaltic vents in the Snake River Plain and adjacent regions. Compiled by Shervais and Glen from a range of sources.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:36 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Distribution of lacustrine sediments deposited by paleo-Lake Idaho in the western Snake River Plain.
Based on maximum extent of Pliocene/Pleistocene lake sediments, diatomites, shale, silt, +/- sandstone, ash layers. Includes algal reefs and oolite reefs.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:35 pm

This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping.

It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface. Compilation of post-Miocene faults in southern Idaho and surrounding region. Dataset evaluated for dilation tendency and slip tendency.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:35 pm

This submission includes an input file, plot file, Fortran conversion file, and 3D data file from the simulation of the temperature profile within the Test Bed #1 of the EGS Collab project. The simulation was executed with PNNL's STOMP-GT simulator, which reads the input file, and produces the STOMP-GT Simulated 2D Temperature Distribution Data (plot.001302 file). The Fortran conversion file, converts the STOMP-GT Simulated 2D Temperature Distribution Data (plot.001302) 2D results in local coordinates to 3D results in Homestake coordinates. This file contains the 2D temperature distribution from a STOMP-GT simulation of the EGS Collab Test Bed #1. The zero point of the grid is the center line of the West Access Drift on the drift floor on the 4850 Level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:35 pm

This submission includes an input file, plot file, Fortran conversion file, and 3D data file from the simulation of the temperature profile within the Test Bed #1 of the EGS Collab project. The simulation was executed with PNNL's STOMP-GT simulator, which reads the input file, and produces the STOMP-GT Simulated 2D Temperature Distribution Data (plot.001302 file). The Fortran conversion file, converts the STOMP-GT Simulated 2D Temperature Distribution Data (plot.001302) 2D results in local coordinates to 3D results in Homestake coordinates. This Fortran code converts 2D STOMP-GT plot files to 3D temperature distributions, assuming a uniform distribution along the West Access Drift on the 4850 Level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:34 pm

This submission includes an input file, plot file, Fortran conversion file, and 3D data file from the simulation of the temperature profile within the Test Bed #1 of the EGS Collab project. The simulation was executed with PNNL's STOMP-GT simulator, which reads the input file, and produces the STOMP-GT Simulated 2D Temperature Distribution Data (plot.001302 file). The Fortran conversion file, converts the STOMP-GT Simulated 2D Temperature Distribution Data (plot.001302) 2D results in local coordinates to 3D results in Homestake coordinates. This file contains temperature distributions around the West Access Drift on the 4850 Level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Homestake coordinates. This file was created from a two-dimensional simulation with STOMP-GT, and translated to a 3D distribution with the Fortran program stomptoleapfrog.f. The formatting for the leapfrog.001302 file is one input per line with x, y, z, t, with dimensions in ft and temperature in ˚C.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:34 pm

The solid Earth strains in response to the gravitational pull from the Moon, Sun, and other planetary bodies. Measuring the flexure of geologic material in response to these Earth tides provides information about the geomechanical properties of rock and sediment. Such measurements are particularly useful for understanding dilation of faults and fractures in competent rock. A new approach to measuring earth tides using fiber optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is presented here. DAS was originally designed to record acoustic vibration through the measurement of dynamic strain on a fiber optic cable. Here, laboratory experiments demonstrate that oscillating strain can be measured with DAS in the microHertz frequency range, corresponding to half-day (M2) lunar tidal cycles. Although the magnitude of strain measured in the laboratory is larger than what would be expected due to earth tides, a clear signal at half-day period was extracted from the data. With the increased signal-to-noise expected from quiet field applications and improvements to DAS using engineered fiber, earth tides could potentially be measured in deep boreholes with DAS. Because of the distributed nature of the sensor (0.25 m measurement interval over kilometers), fractures could be simultaneously located and evaluated. Such measurements would provide valuable information regarding the placement and stiffness of open fractures in bedrock. Characterization of bedrock fractures is an important goal for multiple subsurface operations such as petroleum extraction, geothermal energy recovery, and geologic carbon sequestration.
The data is based on this paper submitted into the Journal "Sensors" : "Distributed Acoustic Sensing of Strain at Earth Tide Frequencies" by Matthew W Becker and Thomas I Coleman, Vol. 19, 2019.

Media file
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6:34 pm

The solid Earth strains in response to the gravitational pull from the Moon, Sun, and other planetary bodies. Measuring the flexure of geologic material in response to these Earth tides provides information about the geomechanical properties of rock and sediment. Such measurements are particularly useful for understanding dilation of faults and fractures in competent rock. A new approach to measuring earth tides using fiber optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is presented here. DAS was originally designed to record acoustic vibration through the measurement of dynamic strain on a fiber optic cable. Here, laboratory experiments demonstrate that oscillating strain can be measured with DAS in the microHertz frequency range, corresponding to half-day (M2) lunar tidal cycles. Although the magnitude of strain measured in the laboratory is larger than what would be expected due to earth tides, a clear signal at half-day period was extracted from the data. With the increased signal-to-noise expected from quiet field applications and improvements to DAS using engineered fiber, earth tides could potentially be measured in deep boreholes with DAS. Because of the distributed nature of the sensor (0.25 m measurement interval over kilometers), fractures could be simultaneously located and evaluated. Such measurements would provide valuable information regarding the placement and stiffness of open fractures in bedrock. Characterization of bedrock fractures is an important goal for multiple subsurface operations such as petroleum extraction, geothermal energy recovery, and geologic carbon sequestration.
These data are associated with the article published in the Journal "Sensors" : "Distributed Acoustic Sensing of Strain at Earth Tide Frequencies" by Matthew W Becker and Thomas I Coleman, Vol. 19, 2019.

Data are in matlab format and are the mean strain rate in nm/s over channels 360-519 as described in the article.

Media file

Pages